Skip to Content

St. Gertrude 2017-2018 Session Seventeen: Temperance and Fortitude

Click here to see all of the RCIA Videos

Catechism of the Catholic Church
Easy Search of the Catechism of the Catholic Church

Part 3, Section 1, Chapter 1, Article 7, Heading 3

1809 Temperance is the moral virtue that moderates the attraction of pleasures and provides balance in the use of created goods. It ensures the will's mastery over instincts and keeps desires within the limits of what is honorable. The temperate person directs the sensitive appetites toward what is good and maintains a healthy discretion: "Do not follow your inclination and strength, walking according to the desires of your heart." Temperance is often praised in the Old Testament: "Do not follow your base desires, but restrain your appetites." In the New Testament it is called "moderation" or "sobriety." We ought "to live sober, upright, and godly lives in this world."

Part 3, Section 1, Chapter 1, Article 7, Heading 3

1808 Fortitude is the moral virtue that ensures firmness in difficulties and constancy in the pursuit of the good. It strengthens the resolve to resist temptations and to overcome obstacles in the moral life. The virtue of fortitude enables one to conquer fear, even fear of death, and to face trials and persecutions. It disposes one even to renounce and sacrifice his life in defense of a just cause. "The Lord is my strength and my song."
"In the world you have tribulation; but be of good cheer, I have overcome the world."