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Search for Provincial Director of Health Services (RN)

02/20/2018 - 8:52am

The Dominican Friars of the Province of St. Joseph are seeking a Director of Health Services (RN) to manage, facilitate, assess and evaluate the ongoing care for our friars. The ideal candidate will possess knowledge of Catholic religious communities of men and a willingness to understand and support the mission, values, customs and traditions of the Dominican Friars of the Province of St. Joseph. The Director of Health Services must possess the competencies and experience required to perform and evaluate holistic health assessments, and a Master’s Degree in Nursing and 10 years’ experience in caring for the sick and elderly in multiple settings is required.

To read the complete position description, click here.

 

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Into The Desert

02/17/2018 - 8:14pm

On this episode of Word to Life, Fr. John Maria Devaney, O.P. highlights the liturgical changes that have occurred now that we’ve entered the season of Lent.

You can listen to the broadcast here.

Image: Ivan Kramskoi — “Christ in the Desert

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The Grace to Be a Priest

02/14/2018 - 4:05pm

Fr. Romanus Cessario, O.P. recently published a volume of reflections on the priesthood. The Grace to Be a Priest represents the fruit of one Dominican’s service as a priest of Jesus Christ. For more than thirty-five years, Romanus Cessario has taught and advised candidates for the priesthood. In this text, Father Cessario explains how the vocation to the priesthood comes to a man as both gift and mystery. God chooses priests to serve as both instruments of his will and spiritual fathers for his people. Drawing on the riches of the Dominican tradition as well as the general principles of Catholic theology, Father Cessario richly illuminates the nature of the priesthood with insights that will instruct priests, seminarians, and laypeople alike.

To learn more and to order the volume, visit Cluny Media or Amazon.com.

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Diaconate Ordination 2018

02/14/2018 - 4:00pm

The Dominican Friars of the Province of St. Joseph

joyfully announce the Ordination of their Brothers

Antoninus Maria Samy, O.P.
Justin Mary Bolger, O.P.
John Paul Kern, O.P.
Joseph Martin Hagan, O.P.
Norbert Keliher, O.P.
John Mark Solitario, O.P.
Paul Mary Clarke, O.P.

to the Order of Deacons through the Imposition of Hands and Prayer of Ordination by

The Most Reverend Timothy P. Broglio,
Archbishop for the Military Services

Saturday, March 10, 2018 at 9:30 am

The Upper Church of the Basilica of the
National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception

400 Michigan Ave N.E.
Washington, D.C.

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Solemn Vows Liturgy and Reception

02/14/2018 - 3:48pm

On Saturday, February 10, 2018, thirteen friars made their Solemn Vows as members of the Order of Preachers: Justin Mary Bolger, O.P., John Paul Kern, O.P., Joseph Martin Hagan, O.P., Jordan Zajac, O.P., Irenaeus Maria Dunlevy, O.P., Jonah Mary Teller, O.P., Ephrem Maria Reese, O.P., John Mark Solitario, O.P., Paul Mary Clarke, O.P., Hyacinth Grubb, O.P., Ambrose Arralde, O.P., Albert Thomas Dempsey, O.P., and Anthony Michael VanBerkum, O.P. The ceremony took place in the Upper Church of the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, DC, and was presided over by the Very Rev. Kenneth Letoile, O.P., Prior Provincial of the Province of St. Joseph. To view an album of photos from the ceremony, click here.

After the Profession Mass, the friars and their families had a celebration at the Dominican House of Studies, which included performances by a Jazz ensemble made up of Dominican friars as well as the Hillbilly Thomists.

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Lent Is For Lovers

02/14/2018 - 12:08pm

The Dominican Friars of St. Gertrude Parish in Cincinnati, OH have developed a unique preaching program for the season of Lent: Lent Is For Lovers. Drawing on the coincidence of Ash Wednesday and Valentine’s Day falling on the same day, the program includes both daily Lenten reflections posted on YouTube as well as several talks and a Parish Mission drawing on the theme of how prayer, fasting, and almsgiving grows out of love.

On February 13, Fr. Gabriel Torretta, O.P. was interviewed by the Cincinnati Evening News on ABC9 about the program:

Visit the Lent Is For Lovers website to sign up for daily emails and to learn more about the program.

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Be Made Clean

02/10/2018 - 3:04pm

Fr. John Maria Devaney, O.P. welcomes Mr. Joseph Campo to Word to Life. Joseph is the Co-Founder of Grassroots Films, and the Director of the film “Outcasts“. The two reflect on the readings for the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time and the work of the Grassroots Film company.

You can listen to the podcast here.

Image: William Blake — Christ Giving Sight to Bartimaeus

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The Divine Physician

02/02/2018 - 5:28pm

On this episode of Word to Life, Fr. John Maria Devaney, O.P. welcomes Officer Charlie Carroll of the NYPD, who is also a candidate for the permanent diaconate in the Archdiocese of New York. The two discuss the readings for the Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time and the role of the deacon in the Church today.

You can listen to the podcast here.

Image: Christ Pantocrator

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New Dominican Community in Philadelphia

01/29/2018 - 8:19pm

In July 2018, the Dominican Friars of the Province of St. Joseph will begin a new Dominican community in Philadelphia. The Province has a long history of service to the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, with friars having served in the past at Holy Name of Jesus Parish and on the faculties of various institutions of higher learning in the Philadelphia area. On July 1, four Dominican friars will begin ministry in Philadelphia, with two serving as Pastor and Parochial Vicar of St. Patrick’s Parish near Rittenhouse Square, one joining the faculty of an Archdiocesan high school and a fourth assisting with various ministries.

The Prior Provincial, Very Reverend Kenneth Letoile, OP, made the following statement about the new apostolate: “We are delighted to accept Archbishop Chaput’s gracious invitation to establish a new Dominican community in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. It comes at a providential moment for us: vocations to our Dominican province have been increasing over recent years, and we have long wanted to return to Philadelphia in order to serve the vibrant local church there. The Dominican Order was founded over 800 years ago as the Order of Preachers, and ever since, Dominicans have been dedicated to the work of preaching and teaching the faith. We are therefore very happy to be able to minister in the Archdiocese by accepting the pastoral care for Saint Patrick’s Church in Rittenhouse Square, which offers a rectory with sufficient space for a full Dominican community of priests and brothers, and a pastoral setting congruent with our charism.”

Photos from CatholicPhilly.com and PhillyChurchProject.

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Conference on Thomas Aquinas and the Greek Fathers

01/29/2018 - 8:18pm

In January 2018, thirteen Dominican friars joined scholars from around the world to examine the relationship of Thomas Aquinas and the Greek Fathers at a conference in Ave Maria, FL cosponsored by the Aquinas Center for Theological Renewal at Ave Maria University and the Thomistic Institute.

Fr. Andrew Hofer, OP of the Dominican House of Studies in Washington, DC, served as co-organizer of the conference and gave a paper titled “Aquinas and the Greek Fathers for Renewing Theology Today.” Four other professors from the Dominican House of Studies gave presentations: Fr. John Baptist Ku, OP spoke on “St. Gregory of Nazianzus and St. Thomas Aquinas on God the Father”; Fr. Dominic Langevin, OP, spoke on “The Eucharist as Medicine in the Greek Fathers and St. Thomas Aquinas”; Fr. Dominic Legge, OP, spoke on “Trinity and Christology in the Transfiguration: Aquinas and the Greek Fathers”; and Fr. Thomas Joseph White, OP spoke about “Beauty as a divine attribute: from Dionysius to Aquinas.”

Five other friars of the Province of St. Joseph gave papers: Fr. Peter Totleben, OP spoke on “Maximus the Confessor and Thomas Aquinas on Free Choice in Christ”; Fr. Austin Dominic Litke, OP, spoke on “Thomas Aquinas on Nestorianism”; Fr. Reginald Lynch, OP, spoke about “Trinitarian Procession in Thomas Aquinas and Manuel Calecas”; Fr. Raymund Snyder, OP, spoke on “Aquinas’s Adaptation of the Neoplatonic Triad of Being, Life, and Intellect: Proclus, Pseudo-Dionysius, and the Essential Perfections”; and Fr. Innocent Smith, OP, spoke about “Pseudo-Dionysius and the Liturgical Theology of Thomas Aquinas”

They were joined by three other Dominican friars . Fr. Bernhard Blankenhorn, OP, a professor at the Angelicum, delivered a paper on “The Christo-centric Mystical Theologies of Maximos the Confessor and Thomas Aquinas”. Br. Gregory Augustine Liu, OP, of the Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology in Berkeley, spoke on “The Greek Patristic Heritage in the Trinitarian Theologies of Thomas Aquinas and Gregory Palamas.” Fr. Sylvain Detoc, OP, of the Catholic University of Lyon, France, delivered a paper on “The theologia philosophorum of Irenaeus compared with that of Thomas Aquinas.”

The variety of topics covered by the Dominican speakers alone reveals the breadth of Thomas Aquinas’s connections with the Greek theological tradition. The conference, which included an array of Catholic and Orthodox speakers, was a profound experience of shared inquiry into the deep connections between the Western and Eastern Christian traditions.

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Wisdom, Cosmos, and Cultus in the Book of Sirach

01/29/2018 - 7:56pm

Fr. Jordan Schmidt, OP recently completed his doctorate in Biblical Studies at the Catholic University of America, defending a Ph.D. dissertation titled “Wisdom, Cosmos, and Cultus in the Book of Sirach.”

Fr. Jordan grew up in North Dakota and received a Bachelor’s degree in English and East Asian Studies from St. John’s University in Collegeville, MN in May 2002. After serving as a Peace Corps volunteer in rural China, he entered the seminary, studying for the diocese of Bismarck at Kenrick-Glennon Seminary in St. Louis, MO from 2004-2006. He joined the Province of St. Joseph in the summer of 2006. After his ordination to the priesthood in 2012, he served as associate pastor to St. Mary’s parish in New Haven, CT.  In the Fall of 2013, he returned to Washington to pursue a doctorate in Biblical Studies at The Catholic University of America. During his time at The Catholic University of America, Fr. Jordan has served as a teaching assistant and teaching fellow in addition to taking on various posts in the School of Theology and Religious Studies student association.

Fr. Jordan describes the focus of his dissertation as follows:

“Despite the attention that has already been paid to the theme of creation in the book of Sirach, scholarship has yet to provide a comprehensive analysis of Ben Sira’s instruction regarding the cosmic order and its role in the divine bestowal of wisdom upon human beings. In particular, a detailed analysis of Ben Sira’s understanding of the place of human beings within the created order remains a desideratum of Sirach studies. A crucial question for examination is how, concretely does Ben Sira view the relationship between human beings and the cosmic order in which God has placed them?” To learn more about Fr. Jordan’s dissertation, click here. To hear a recent talk by Fr. Jordan titled “Who Reads the Bible?”, click here.

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Dominican Friars at the March for Life

01/29/2018 - 7:43pm

On Friday, January 19th, 2018, the Dominican friars marched among thousands at the 45th annual March for Life in Washington, D.C.

The March for Life unites thousands of pro-life advocates from across the country in the single mission of petitioning for the legal protection of the unborn, our society’s most vulnerable members. But in addition to its main purpose of prayer and protest against the tragic sin of abortion, the March acts as an occasion for many other happy and holy events. Saint Paul’s words seem aptly applied here: “Where sin increased, grace overflowed all the more” (Romans 5:20). The Dominican friars were honored to host and to participate in many of these grace-filled moments.

On the day before the March, friars led an Angelic Warfare Enrollment Ceremony for around 35 new members at the Dominican House of Studies. Later in the day, after the opening Vigil Mass for Life at the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, the Dominican House of Studies also hosted an evening of fellowship and prayer for all the pilgrims who were in some way affiliated with the Order of Preachers. Immediately following the Vigil Mass, the priory’s halls were filled with Dominican Sisters, college students, parishioners, high-school groups, seminarians, and other religious from all across the country. Old friends reunited and new friendships began—a witness to the grace of the Holy Spirit moving through the whole of the March for Life weekend. The evening concluded with Compline, the Church’s night prayer. In the candle-lit chapel, the friars and their guests entrusted their intentions for the weekend to Our Lady’s intercession: “After this our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!”

The day of the March itself began with Eucharistic Adoration and Morning Prayer in the Crypt Church of the National Shrine. The student brothers from the Dominican House of Studies led hundreds of pilgrims in a holy hour, during which Brother Columba Thomas, O.P., preached on the sanctity of the life and the powerful  intercession of Mary, the Immaculate Conception. Meanwhile, another group of friars travelled across town to participate in the Youth Rally and Mass for Life at the Capital One Arena.

At noon, the friars gathered at the corner of 12th and Constitution for the March itself. Friars from four of the Dominican provinces in America were present, in addition to many other friars from across the world, all united under a single banner: Dominican Friars for Life. As the crowds waited to begin marching, two Bald Eagles were sighted circling high above the nation’s capital.

The March began at around 1:30 P.M. and didn’t completely finish until well after 3:30 P.M. During the March, participants alternated between praying, talking, singing, chanting, and simply marching in silence for the protection of the unborn. At the end of the March, the friars gathered to sing the Salve Regina at the steps of the Supreme Court: “O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary. Pray for us, Most Holy Mother of God!”

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Domini Canes

01/27/2018 - 2:31pm

Fr. John Maria Devaney, O.P., welcomes two members of the “Hillbilly Thomists“, Br. Justin Bolger, O.P., & Br. Peter Joseph Gautsch, O.P. on Word to Life. They discuss the readings for the Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time, and reflect on how this music is an extension of their Dominican common life.

You can listen the broadcast here.

Image: Alexandre-Francois Desportes — Study of Greyhounds

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I Will Make You Fishers of Men

01/20/2018 - 1:56pm

On today’s Word to Life broadcast, Fr. John Maria Devaney, O.P., and Fr. Augustine Dada discuss the readings for the Third Sunday in Ordinary Time.

You can listen to the broadcast here.

Image: Caravaggio — The Calling of Saint Matthew

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In Medio Stat Virtus

01/13/2018 - 2:48pm

On this episode of Word to Life, Fr. John Maria Devaney, O.P. & Fr. William Holt, O.P. discuss the calling of Samuel, and the importance of the virtues of temperance & chastity in light of Saint Paul’s Letter to the Corinthians.

You can listen to the podcast here.

Image: Abbott Handerson Thayer — A Virgin

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Epiphany Sunday

01/06/2018 - 10:02am

On this episode of Word to Life, Fr. John Maria Devaney, O.P. reflects on the three wise men, and their desire to meet the newborn King.

You can listen to the podcast here.

Image: Edward Burne-Jones — The Adoration of the Magi

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The Feast of the Holy Family

12/30/2017 - 3:19pm

We bid adieu to 2017 on this episode of Word to Life. Fr. John Maria Devaney, O.P. reflects on the readings for this Sunday’s Feast of the Holy Family, and plays a few selections from the album “Christ Was Born to Save.”

You can listen to the podcast here.

Image: Caravaggio — Rest on the Flight Into Egypt (1597)

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Christmastide

12/29/2017 - 2:23pm

On this special edition of Word to Life, Fr. John Maria Devaney, O.P. reflects of the Feast of the Nativity of the Lord, Christmas. Alternating between the writings of Pope Benedict XVI and the music from the album, “Christ Was Born to Save: Christmas with the Dominican Friars,” this episode will help you enter more deeply into the Christmastide season.

You can listen to the podcast here.

Image: Christ Was Born To Save

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Evermore and evermore!

12/26/2017 - 10:57am

On Christmas Morning, Archbishop Augustine Di Noia, O.P. delivered the following homily at the Dominican House of Studies in Washington, DC.

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ.   Merry Christmas and welcome to all who join the Dominican friars on this Christmas morning. Let no tongue on earth be silent, / every voice in concert sing, / Evermore and evermore.  Let us together keep Christmas as the festival of the Nativity of the only begotten Son of God according to the flesh. Let us worship God, the adventurer of love, who so loved our poor human nature that he placed it imperishably for all eternity in the very midst of the blazing furnace of his Godhead. God was not satisfied to be in himself, as it were, but in addition willed to be a human being. Now that God himself belongs to it as a brother, humankind is not just an anonymous multitude but a sacred family (cf. Karl Rahner, Everyday Faith).

To those who accept him Christ gave the power to become children of God.   The Son of God became a son of man so that the sons and daughters of man could become the children of God. O amazing goodness of God! Of the Father’s love begotten, Christ was born the only Son, but would not remain so. He did not hesitate to admit joint heirs to his inheritance, brothers and sisters by adoption who would share in his inheritance without lessening its worth. The Word was made flesh in order that so apparently incredible a grace—that men should be born of God—would not alarm or surprise us: why marvel that men are born of God when God himself was born of man? (cf. St. Augustine, Tractatus on John, ii. 13 & 15).

How partial must any mere humanism seem when, in and through the Son of the Father and of the Virgin, man is to become God and thus infinitely more than man. The Incarnation has radically altered the shape and direction of human history. In Jesus of Nazareth, delivered to us as Christ and Lord, the human race has experienced in its earthly history a definitive and unsurpassable coming of God in the flesh. While in times past God spoke in partial ways to our ancestors through the prophets, in these last days he has spoken to us through the Son. While retaining his ineffable mystery, in Jesus of Nazareth God has expressed himself as Word wholly and irrevocably. This is He Whom seers in old time / Chanted of with one accord; / Whom the voices of the prophets / Promised in faithful word; / Now He shines the long expected / Let creation praise its Lord, / Evermore and evermore. The sorrow and tragedy of human history—of which we continue, day in and day out, to be the dismayed witnesses—must after all have a blessed outcome if God takes part in it himself.

This monumental transformation of human existence, even if fully visible only to the eyes of faith, could not have remained completely hidden. We saw his glory, the glory as of the only begotten Son of the Father. The Nativity of the only begotten Son according to the flesh—in Bethlehem, at midnight, in piercing cold—was humble and mysterious, to be sure. This birth came in conditions of ignorance, superstition, and cruelty, greed and hatred, lust and hypocrisy—indeed, conditions not unlike our own. But his birth was not unknown or unacknowledged. All creatures recognized their Lord: the angels summoned the shepherds and the star alerted the Magi. The very universe itself shouted louder than any trumpet that the king of heaven had come. Devils fled, diseases were healed, graves gave up their dead, and souls were brought out of wickedness to the outmost height of virtue (St. John Chrysostom, Homily, XII, 1). For the Lord has bared his holy arm in the sight of all the nations and all the ends of the earth behold the salvation of our God.   Thus, we must sing:  Let no tongue on earth be silent, / every voice in concert sing, / Evermore and evermore.

No one is excluded from the joy of Christmas. All share the same reason for rejoicing. Our Lord, victorious over sin and death, finding no man free from sin, came to free us all. Let the saint rejoice, and the sinner be glad. Let the unbeliever take courage as he is summoned to life (cf. St. Leo the Great, Sermon 1 in Nat. Domini). During Advent, we prayed that Christ would show himself to those who have never known him, to let them see his saving work, and to let them see his glory. Perhaps in the popular celebration of Christmas we can discern at least a partial answer to our prayers for those who do not yet believe in Christ.

Christmas is the single biggest event on the planet, and nothing affects so many people around the world every year as Christmas does. Most Americans—Christians, adherents of other faiths, and non-believers—celebrate Christmas. The Christmas tree, the wreath, gift giving, the universally observed legal holiday, the merriment, even the public crèche—these can seem to be manifestations of a merely secular spirit of Christmas. But Jesus Christ, not the winter solstice, is unquestionably the reason for the season. This allegedly secular festival would not exist apart from the fact that the birth of Christ is celebrated on this day and in this season. Put Christ back into Christmas, some like to say. But who has the power to take him out of Christmas?  God has come to us and no one can take him away from us, for Christ the Lord is now our brother.  Many aspects of the popular celebration of Christmas seem to represent little more than cultural ritual, to be sure, but there are unmistakably religious undertones. Otherwise, why would activist atheists campaign so ferociously against every hint of Christmas observance in public spaces?

Whether it be “White Christmas” or “Blue Christmas,” “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” or “All I Want for Christmas”—popular Christmas music is full of unrequited love, disappointment and, above all, longing. The desire to find the perfect gift for a loved one, to meet the perfect companion for life, to have the perfect family, to enjoy a perfectly peaceful life with one’s family, friends and neighbors—all this Christmastide nostalgia and yearning cannot fail to appear to the eyes of faith as an expression of the longing for him that God has planted in every human heart. Even an unbeliever might ask himself in an unguarded moment if in his heart of hearts there does not lay the unlikely courage to believe in Christmas.

Like La Befana—the Italian mythical figure who brings presents to children at Epiphany as she searches for the Christ child whom she refused to visit when invited to do so by the shepherds and the Magi but now seems never to be able to find—like her, many unbelievers, immersed in the observances of the Christmas festival, search for a fulfilment that annually slips from their grasp because they cannot find their way to the Christ child. Christmas is a time when many who consider themselves non-believers feel a stirring of the spirit.  Whether it starts at the mall or on the Hallmark channel, it not infrequently leads them to church at Christmas time. To a Catholic sensibility, the apparently shallow aspects of the popular Christmas celebration might possess a certain truth and depth after all. The seeming pretense of the secular festival is then not the ultimate truth about it. Behind it stands the holy and silent truth that God has in fact come and celebrates Christmas with us (cf. Rahner, ibid.).

Brothers and sisters in Christ, God made Christmas without consulting us. There is nothing for us to do for the time allotted to its annual celebration but to fall under its spell, to yield our hearts to its enchantments, to sing the Christmas songs and carols, to love our neighbor and be merry, to venerate with integrity of faith the mystery of so wondrous an Incarnation,  and to worship and give fervent thanks to God Father, Son and Holy Spirit for the amazing love that has been shown to the human race—that for men to be born of God, God did not hesitate to be born of man.   O ye heights of heaven adore Him; / Angel hosts, His praises sing; / Powers, dominions, bow before Him, / and extol our God and King! / Let no tongue on earth be silent, / Every voice in concert sing, / Evermore and evermore! Amen.

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Solemn Vows 2018

12/23/2017 - 2:21pm

The Dominican Friars of the Province of St. Joseph

joyfully announce the Solemn Profession of their Brothers

Justin Mary Bolger, O.P.
John Paul Kern, O.P.
Joseph Martin Hagan, O.P.
Jordan Zajac, O.P.
Irenaeus Maria Dunlevy, O.P.
Jonah Mary Teller, O.P.
Ephrem Maria Reese, O.P.
John Mark Solitario, O.P.
Paul Mary Clarke, O.P.
Hyacinth Grubb, O.P.
Ambrose Arralde, O.P.
Albert Thomas Dempsey, O.P.
Anthony Michael VanBerkum, O.P.

Saturday, February 10, 2018 at 9:30 am

The Upper Church of the Basilica of the
National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception

400 Michigan Ave N.E.
Washington, D.C.

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